the 411 on strength training

Incorporating strength training into your regular movement routine can improve everything from muscle and bone health to mental health, and is even linked to reducing all cause mortality.

There's nothing new about strength training. It's one of the oldest forms of physical fitness and, in the last few years, it's made its way back into the forefront of the industry. With strength workouts gaining popularity in group class bookings and trending on social media, the hype is real but it's not unfounded. Incorporating strength training into your regular movement routine can improve everything from muscle and bone health to mental health, and is even linked to reducing all cause mortality. But don't take our word for it, let the numbers do the talking. 

When it comes to muscle mass, it's a use it or lose it situation; studies show that after the age of 30, adults average a loss of 3-8% muscle mass per decade. Consistent strength training decreases those numbers, as well as helps to lower the risks that come with muscle mass loss. This includes increasing bone density by up to 3% per year and reducing the risk of falls in older adults by up to 40%.

Still on the fence? Consider this: a study completed by the British Journal of Sports Medicine, found that people who lifted weights 30-60 minutes per week exhibited an average of 20% lower all cause mortality rate. That's an incredible benefit that can be accessed with less than 8 minutes of strength training every day. 

If we're honest, that last statistic really sold us, and yet there are even more reasons to commit to regular strength training:

Get better sleep: strength training can get you an extra 40 minutes of sleep per night 

Get loose: it can lead to a 30% improvement in mobility + flexibility 

Get happy: it's shown to significantly reduce symptoms of chronic stress, anxiety, and depression

One of the best parts about strength training workouts is that they come in all shapes and sizes so they're easily accessible. They are simply any workout based around muscle contraction rather than cardio endurance, which can range from heavy lifting at your local gym to pilates classes, resistance training, and even a sculpt class with the ness.